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20th Century Car Club hosted first cruise-in of the season Saturday

GTNS photo by Gretchen Teske

Cars from across the state cruised into Mt. Pleasant on Friday, May 10, for the first 20th Century Car Club cruise-in of the season.
GTNS photo by Gretchen Teske Cars from across the state cruised into Mt. Pleasant on Friday, May 10, for the first 20th Century Car Club cruise-in of the season.
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Rick and Christine Stauffer are cruise-in regulars. On average, they attend two shows a weekend from April to October and on Friday, May 10, they were stationed in their hometown of Mt. Pleasant for the 20th Century Car Club’s first cruise-in of the season.

“I do a list every year. It’s called ‘Rick’s List’ and it covers a seven-state area, so I go to a lot of events,” he said.

His reason for coming to the one in Mt. Pleasant was simple. “It’s a car event and that’s enough reason for me,” he said with a laugh.

Pete Kilbourn, president of the 20th Century Car Club, said they host cruise-ins every year on the second Friday of the month from May to September. It depends on the evening, but on its busiest nights, about 125 cars can be set up downtown.

Due to construction, the cruise-in was held on a blocked-off portion of Main Street, adjacent to the Henry County Courthouse, and in the parking lot behind Paul Revere’s. Traditionally, the cruise-in is held around the square.

Kilbourn said their cruise-ins collect people from all over, which makes the night a success.

“Keokuk, Burlington, we get them from all over. You never know, we even get them from out of state,” he said. “They like to come here because they like to visit.”

Visiting from out of town was Ron Tanner, who drove up from Ft. Dodge for his first Mt. Pleasant cruise-in. Tanner said he’s been interested in cars since high school and they have become his passion for the last 40 years.

“I grew up around this stuff,” he said. “It’s a good pastime.”

He said he enjoys visiting different cruise-ins because he likes to visit with the people and answer questions about his car because he likes to get people interested in cars.

“They come up and they ask questions and they ask questions, that’s what we enjoy,” he said. “We want another generation to come up and ask questions.”

His buddy Jerry Krogmeier drove up for the cruise-in, also, and said he enjoys informing the public about cars because there is a lot to learn about classic cars that cannot be taught in schools.

“We’ve always said if they don’t learn from us, they’ll make the mistakes we made 50 years ago. So why don’t you just listen to us old geezers,” he said with a laugh. “You might learn something.”